The Uses of Antiquity: The Scientific Revolution and the Classical Tradition


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Selected Works about Isaac Newton and his Thought

Hall, eds. Hall, Philosophers at war. Hanen, M. Osler, and R. Weyant, eds. Harman and A. Shapiro, eds. Whiteside Cambridge: CUP, Harper and G. Leplin, ed. Harrison, "Newtonian science, miracles, and the Laws of Nature", Journal of the history of ideas 56 , Brooke and I. Maclean, eds. Higgitt, R.

India: Crash Course History of Science #4

Iliffe and M. Keynes, eds. Hiscock, ed. Horsefield, British monetary experiments, London: G. Horsley, ed. Commentariis illustrabat Samuel Horsley, LL. London, Hunter, ed. Lawrence and S. Shapin, eds. Iliffe, "Lying wonders and juggling tricks: religion, nature and imposture in early modern England", in J. Force and D. Katz, eds. Biagioli and P. Galison, eds. Iliffe, "Isaac Newton", in K. Knox and R. Noakes, eds.

Iliffe, "Prosecuting Athanasius: protestant forensics and the mirrors of persecution", in Force and Hutton, Newton and Newtonianism , Brooks and E. Ihsanoglu, eds. Hessayon and N. Keene, eds. Jacob, "Newton and the French Prophets: new evidence", History of science 16 , Jones, ed. Klaaren, Religious origins of modern science. Eerdmans Publishing Co. Kubrin, "Newton and the cyclical cosmos: providence and the mechanical philosophy", Journal of the history of ideas 28 , Kubrin, "Providence and the mechanical philosophy: the creation and dissolution of the world in Newtonian thought.

A study of the relations of science and religion in seventeenth-century England": doctoral thesis Cornell University, Leshem, Newton on mathematics and spiritual purity Dordrecht and London: Kluwer, Lindberg and R. Numbers, eds. Historical essays on the encounter between Christianity and science Berkeley: University of California Press, Link-Salinger et al. McCulloch, ed. McGuire and P. McGuire, "Existence, actuality and necessity: Newton on space and time", Annals of science 25 , McGuire and M.

McLachlan, ed. Theological manuscripts Liverpool: At the University Press, MacLean, ed. Macphail, Alchemy and the occult: a catalogue of books and manuscripts from the collection of Paul and Mary Mellon given to Yale University Library , 4 vols. New Haven: Yale University Library, ; new edition Mamiani, ed. Mandelbrote, ed. Mandelbrote, "Newton and Newtonianism: an introduction", in Studies in the history and philosophy of science 35 , Frank, T.

Leinkauf and M. Wriedt, eds. Mandelbrote, "Isaac Newton and the Flood", in M. Mulsow and J. Assmann, eds. Mandelbrote, "Fatio and the Principia ", Oberwolfach reports 3 , Bracht and D.

Participating universities

Manuel, Isaac Newton, historian Cambridge, Mass. Markley, "Newton, corruption, and the tradition of universal history", in Force and Popkin, Newton and religion , Merkel and A. Debus, eds. Intellectual history and the occult in early modern Europe Washington, D.

Ancient Greek Science

Morano, ed. More, Isaac Newton. Newman, "The corpuscular transmutational theory of Eirenaeus Philalethes", in Clericuzio and Rattansi, Alchemy and chemistry , Newman and L. Principe, "Alchemy vs. Newman and A. Grafton, eds. Newton, The chronology of ancient kingdoms amended. Newton, Observations upon the prophecies of Daniel, and the Apocalypse of St.

In Two Parts London, Oakley, eds. Osler and P. Farber, eds. Essays in honor of Richard S.

The Renaissance: The 'Rebirth' of Science & Culture

Westfall Cambridge: CUP, Pera and W. Shea, eds. Pfizenmaier, "Was Isaac Newton an Arian? Popkin, ed. Brill, H Popkin and G. Weiner, eds. Principe and W. Newman, "Some problems with the historiography of alchemy", in Newman and Grafton, Secrets of Nature , The printing press was developed in Europe by Johannes Gutenberg in It allowed Bibles, secular books, printed music and more to be made in larger amounts and reach more people.


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Wilde said one of the most significant changes that occurred during the Renaissance was the "evolution of Renaissance humanism as a method of thinking … This new outlook underpinned so much of the world then and now. Wilde described Renaissance humanism as "attempts by man to master nature rather than develop religious piety.

Renaissance readers understood these classical texts as focusing on human decisions, actions and creations, rather than unquestioningly following the rules set forth by the Catholic Church as "God's plan. Renaissance humanism was an "ethical theory and practice that emphasized reason, scientific inquiry and human fulfillment in the natural world," said Abernethy.

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Both classical and Renaissance art focused on human beauty and nature. People, even when in religious works, were depicted living life and showing emotion. Perspective and light and shadow techniques improved and paintings looked more three-dimensional and realistic. Patrons made it possible for successful Renaissance artists to work and develop new techniques. The Catholic Church commissioned most artwork during the Middle Ages, and while it continued to do so during the Renaissance, wealthy individuals also became important patrons, according to Cox.

The most famous patrons were the Medici family in Florence, who supported the arts for much of the 15 th and 16 th centuries. Florence was the initial epicenter of Renaissance art but by the end of the 15 th century, Rome had overtaken it. Pope Leo X a Medici ambitiously filled the city with religious buildings and art. This period, from the s to the s, is known as the High Renaissance. As with art, musical innovations in the Renaissance were partly made possible because patronage expanded beyond the Catholic Church. According to the Metropolitan Museum of Art , new technologies resulted in the invention of several new instruments, including the harpsichord and violin family.

The printing press meant that sheet music could be more widely disseminated.

Renaissance Philosophy | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Renaissance music was characterized by its humanist traits. Composers read classical treatises on music and aimed to create music that would touch listeners emotionally. They began to incorporate lyrics more dramatically into compositions and considered music and poetry to be closely related, according to the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Renaissance literature, too, was characterized by humanist themes and a return to classical ideals of tragedy and comedy, according to the Brooklyn College English Department. Shakespeare's works, especially "Hamlet," are good examples of this. Themes like human agency, life's non-religious meanings and the true nature of man are embraced, and Hamlet is an educated Renaissance man. The most prevalent societal change during the Renaissance was the fall of feudalism and the rise of a capitalist market economy, said Abernethy.

Increased trade and the labor shortage caused by the Black Death gave rise to something of a middle class. It raises important questions about the role of the Humanities, and indeed, on an even grander scale, what it means to be human. It uses them as a springboard into relevant modern issues like bioengineering and artificial intelligence. This is the sustenance of the reader who likes to deep-dive into literature. This website uses cookies to improve user experience.


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The Uses of Antiquity: The Scientific Revolution and the Classical Tradition The Uses of Antiquity: The Scientific Revolution and the Classical Tradition
The Uses of Antiquity: The Scientific Revolution and the Classical Tradition The Uses of Antiquity: The Scientific Revolution and the Classical Tradition
The Uses of Antiquity: The Scientific Revolution and the Classical Tradition The Uses of Antiquity: The Scientific Revolution and the Classical Tradition
The Uses of Antiquity: The Scientific Revolution and the Classical Tradition The Uses of Antiquity: The Scientific Revolution and the Classical Tradition
The Uses of Antiquity: The Scientific Revolution and the Classical Tradition The Uses of Antiquity: The Scientific Revolution and the Classical Tradition

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