Shooting Digital: Pro Tips for Taking Great Pictures with Your Digital Camera, Second Edition


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Opt for an external flash or a mounted one you can direct to bounce off ceilings or walls. You can get pretty creative with this too, depending on how many people are drawing, and your source of light. Find a dark room or wait until after the sun sets and turn off any nearby lights. Set your camera to the lowest ISO, usually or Then set your aperture around 2. Press the shutter release, then turn on your flashlight and start drawing! You can quickly move it around, or take it slow and draw with detail, just like you would on paper. Review your image and you can adjust the aperture or shutter speed as needed.

After a few adjustments you should have it down, and ready to draw anything with the flashlight! These allow the cameras to be smaller, lighter, and more affordable. The tradeoff is usually quality and low light performance and it will affect focal length of lenses you choose for specific photographs. It is relatively difficult to tell the difference in quality, so when it comes to the price savings, a smaller sensor is a great choice for folks just starting out. A prime, or fixed lens does a few things to help your photos.

This includes not blowing inside the camera too. Leave it alone and take your camera to a local Borrowlenses for cleaning. It may be tempting to choose one of the largest memory cards you can afford, but consider getting multiple smaller memory cards instead. Although digital storage is relatively stable, there is still a chance your data could corrupt.

If you have a very large memory card and plan to keep using it until you run out of space, your chances of losing all of your photographs are much higher than if you switched out with smaller cards in between sessions. More megapixels listed on a digital camera is not a clear sign of better quality, and manufacturers are beginning to drop out of this megapixel race to put the focus back on quality. Do megapixels matter though?

Putting a clear or UV camera lens filter on each lens you have is a great way to help avoid lens damage and is worth the investment compared to repairing or replacing scratched lenses.


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Sometimes these filters can cause flares on your images though, so pay attention. You may have to remove the filter for some photographs. While framing a shot, visually break it down into a grid of nine equal rectangles and place your subject on one of the four intersections for a natural look. The rule of thirds in photography is not a hard and fast rule, but a good guideline to follow instead of just placing your subject dead center by default.

Most of us see everything from about five and a half feet from the ground, and if your photography is only done at eye level, things can look boring. Experiment with different angles to discover new perspectives. Get on a chair or crouch down—anything to get above or below your subject to find an interesting perspective. Move in or out, or zoom in or out.

How to Shoot in Low Light 9 Commonly Asked Questions

Use a wider aperture to keep distracting elements out of focus. Try a panning shot that keeps a subject in motion in focus while everything else becomes blurry. Try to mix things up by actively remembering to rotate your camera vertically for a different look. This keeps you in the mindset to be open to other possibilities. This can often result in improved photographs too! A photograph with weak composition will leave viewers confused about what they should be focusing on.

Lines that converge create depth and draw the viewer in while curved lines can take you around the frame and eventually land on the main subject. To add another dimension to your composition, be aware of depth of field. Depth of field in photography is the relation of how sharp the plane of focus is compared to everything away from that plane.

Depth of field is largely determined by the aperture size you set and your distance to the subject. Wider apertures emphasize depth of field, and so does getting closer to your subject. Visit an art gallery, hop online, or find some art books and study composition from masters of the art world. These artists typically work within a frame and through many years of expertise make decisions about composition. When composing, consider the direction your subject is moving in or facing and give it extra space over there.

When you leave too much empty space or zoom out too much, it makes your subject a lot smaller relative to the entire picture. This deemphasizes the importance of your subject and can make it difficult for viewers to determine what your subject actually is. Look for unique details or features you can focus in on and push everything else out of the frame. Perhaps you want to create tension by putting your subject up against the edges.

Maybe you want to shoot a whole series dead center and ignore the rule of thirds. Use the rules as a guide, but be sure to break them and experiment to discover something new. It will help you avoid unusable photos from overexposing bright whites and underexposing dark details in lower light situations. Here are 7 examples of reading histograms from Clickin Moms. RAW files are much larger than JPEGs, but they are uncompressed images that let you correct things up to a point like exposure, white balance, and colors during post-processing with less of a quality loss than if you were to edit the JPEG instead.

Kids, pets, wildlife, and many other subjects can be unpredictable. Burst mode will let your camera continuously capture images as you hold down the shutter button. In addition to burst mode, you want to make sure you have the right shutter speed to have the image look right without sacrificing exposure.

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Aperture priority - Usually labeled A or Av. Use this mode when you want control over depth of field, or how sharp your photos look at varying distances from the plane of focus. Shutter priority - Usually labeled S or Tv. Use shutter priority when you want to prioritize capturing something in motion like for wildlife, kids sports, people, or vehicles. Program mode - Similar to fully automatic mode, except you can adjust the aperture and shutter setting combination for desired effect and still achieve proper exposure.

This is good for when you just want to make sure you get a properly exposed shot, with flexibility when needed. Using built-in flash as a primary light source can create very harsh shadows and an unflattering look. Leave the white balance and ISO settings on automatic. Automate what you can and work on your other skills. When lighting conditions change, our eyes adapt automatically.

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Digital camera sensors cannot do the same thing so we have to adjust white balance settings to keep images from looking too blue or too yellow. Color temperature is measured on the Kelvin scale. Thanks for sharing! Gets me all inspired and wanting to try new things!!

I always love your tips and trick about photography. Cant wait to use this new photography tips of you. Sure, this is a wonderful post. I am learning a lot of photography tips as a newbie in the industry. Thanks for the post. Not a Dull Moment. I read each and every word. Very Informative and i loved how you explained everything in detail. Its really inspiring me to move to another level in my photography.

Thanks for sharing this useful post. Beginners always face various troubles. Thank you very much for the tips provided cause they come in handy for both kinds of photographers. Such items should be saved for further use. All the 40 tips you have given are really helpful. I have got many useful tips from this blog of yours. Thanks for sharing the pieces of information. Really great article. Thanks for taking the time to explain things in such great detail in a way that is easy to understand.

Messing with my camera I accidentally got a shot just like this that turned out great. Great post! ProRes Raw, nevertheless, will be with us for quite some time.

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Recording RAW from Arri, Sony, Canon and Panasonic cameras is not simply convenient, in addition, it gives a much more affordable solution in conditions of media prices. HDMI settings can be readily accessed via the menu. In HDR mode, usage of an optional snap-on sun hood is necessary, as displaying a broader brightness range lowers the total brightness of the monitor. However you would like to shoot, the FS5 II adapts to satisfy your style.

The ability to fix the ND filter to keep exposure usually means that you have the ability to set your F-stop and the corresponding depth-of-field appearance, and maintain that, irrespective of any alterations to your lighting situation. That capability is built in the Shogun Inferno. Such great photography tips and technique information share. This post is so helpful for a beginner photographer. Your email address will not be published. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

Our mission at BorrowLenses is to advance the photographic and cinematic dreams of pros and novices by providing superior, cutting-edge gear in an affordable way. Rent, shoot, return. You choose what you want, when you want it, and for how long you want to rent it for. Gear arrives fully tested and cleaned in laser-cut foam with a return label for an easy experience. Welcome to our blog! The following two tabs change content below. Bio Latest Posts. Browse the largest online selection of photo and video gear rentals and have them delivered right to your door! Our blog is where you can learn about fellow image makers, discover new arrivals, and keep up on sales and other events.

Latest posts by BorrowLenses see all. Like this: Like Loading Check out these other great articles! Photo Technolabs on June 16, at am. There is only one way to get to know wildlife…spend time with them. Sit with them. Watch them. This also ties into patience , which I will discuss in more detail later. The image below was captured by knowing what the Lilac-Breasted Roller was going to do to its grasshopper-lunch, and being ready for it. There are certain unwritten rules that form the foundation of good photography — regardless of genre.

Test the boundaries a bit, you know? Take a look at the image below. Yet sometimes it can work to shoot an image in which the subject is not giving the photographer eye contact, as this often means the animal is busy with something else, too busy to turn its attention to you. The first piece of advice I got from a professional wildlife photographer when I started shooting, is to stick to the hours of golden light.


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This means getting up early in the morning and being in the field before sunrise, and going out in the afternoon to make the most of the last hours of sunlight. The light over midday mostly between 11h00 and 16h00, at least where I live is generally harsh and robs images of that spunk that it needs. The exception is an overcast day, when the clouds act like a massive soft-box to filter out the light evenly. On days like that I shoot all day as long as there are willing subjects! Since photography is all about painting with light , you need to know how to use the light to your best advantage in wildlife photography as well.

The good news is that light from the wrong direction can add lots of mood to an image. Shooting into the light is tricky to pull off, but if you adhere to tip 1 Know your Gear you can get some pretty interesting images from a less-than-ideal light position. The image below is one such a photo. Now I know this is location-dependant as you might need more than mm just to get any shot at all in certain wide-open spaces, but the issue I want to tackle is more related to our obsession to get as close as possible to the animals and isolate them totally from their environment.


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  4. The result is often an image that looks like it could be taken of a captive subject in a controlled location, with a perfect smooth background and no idea of the real environment in which it finds itself. Challenge yourself to shoot at a wider angle to give the viewer a better idea of where you took the image and where your subject has to carve out a living in the wild. This is applicable to any species you photograph — from the squirrel to the deer to the elephant.

    The elephant below was photographed with a wide-angle lens and a polarising filter to give you a sense of the environment as well as to make the most of the clouds and sky. This will also help you think in terms of more abstract compositional arrangements. Have a look at this photo of a Cape Buffalo for example. No real intricate explanation needed on this one. If you have a good view of more than one member of a species — stay a while! Look at the images below. First up — a solitary African Spoonbill, minding its own business on a perch, happy as can be.

    Throw another Spoonbill into the mix, and you have a recipe for good interaction. The point-of-view of a wildlife photograph is just about everything. How you portray your subject can make all the difference in the world. In short — try to get an eye-level perspective even lower if you can. Always bear in mind the constraints of your environment. In most reserves in South Africa you are not allowed to get out of your vehicle in the field.

    This restricts you to a certain perspective. Look at these images for illustration. The first African Painted Dog was photographed from an open game viewer. The result is a somewhat bland shot — nothing special in my eyes. The second one, however, was taken lying flat on my stomach in a sandy riverbed not 20 meters from the pack of canines, and the Alpha Male was checking me out…this perspective makes the image come alive.

    Shooting Digital: Pro Tips for Taking Great Pictures with Your Digital Camera, Second Edition Shooting Digital: Pro Tips for Taking Great Pictures with Your Digital Camera, Second Edition
    Shooting Digital: Pro Tips for Taking Great Pictures with Your Digital Camera, Second Edition Shooting Digital: Pro Tips for Taking Great Pictures with Your Digital Camera, Second Edition
    Shooting Digital: Pro Tips for Taking Great Pictures with Your Digital Camera, Second Edition Shooting Digital: Pro Tips for Taking Great Pictures with Your Digital Camera, Second Edition
    Shooting Digital: Pro Tips for Taking Great Pictures with Your Digital Camera, Second Edition Shooting Digital: Pro Tips for Taking Great Pictures with Your Digital Camera, Second Edition
    Shooting Digital: Pro Tips for Taking Great Pictures with Your Digital Camera, Second Edition Shooting Digital: Pro Tips for Taking Great Pictures with Your Digital Camera, Second Edition
    Shooting Digital: Pro Tips for Taking Great Pictures with Your Digital Camera, Second Edition Shooting Digital: Pro Tips for Taking Great Pictures with Your Digital Camera, Second Edition

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