Managing stress : from theory to application


Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online Managing stress : from theory to application file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with Managing stress : from theory to application book. Happy reading Managing stress : from theory to application Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF Managing stress : from theory to application at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF Managing stress : from theory to application Pocket Guide.
We’re listening — tell us what you think

It gives you more energy and improves your concentration so you can focus and tackle the situation. The longer you deal with stress, the more harmful it is to your health. You also have a higher risk for infections and cancer due to a weaker immune system. Knowing the signs and stages of stress can help you take appropriate steps to manage your stress level and lower your risk of complications.

If not, your risk for exhaustion rises. Other techniques for stress management include meditation and deep-breathing exercises. Identifying your triggers can take some time and self-reflection. In the meantime, there are things you can try to help calm or quiet your anxiety…. If your take on meditation is that it's boring or too "new age," then read this. One man shares how - and why - he learned to meditate even though he….

Cholesterol is a fatty substance that's needed to build cells. Since she was diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer in , Emily Garnett has learned many ways to navigate her care. Here are some of the tips she…. Breast cancer treatment can be overwhelming. In this article, a patient advocate tells her story about how she learned to celebrate the daily…. Emily Garnett was diagnosed with breast cancer the same week she celebrated her 5-year anniversary with her husband.

Job stress

Here's what she and her husband…. This is a detailed review of the alkaline diet, including foods to eat and avoid and an in-depth look at the science behind it. If you have celiac disease or a gluten sensitivity, it's important to avoid the protein gluten. Here are 8 gluten-free grains you can eat instead. Meat is a highly controversial food, and you may wonder whether it's good or bad for you.

This article explains everything you need to know about meat. A breast cancer navigator can be beneficial, especially if you've been diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer. In this Ask the Expert, a patient….

Stress Appraisal Theory

What Is General Adaptation Syndrome? Medically reviewed by Timothy J. What is general adaptation syndrome? General adaptation syndrome stages. Picturing the stages of general adaptation syndrome. When does general adaptation syndrome occur? Here Are 11 Ways to Cope. Effects of an internet-based lifestyle intervention on cardio-metabolic risks and stress in Korean workers with metabolic syndrome: A controlled trial. Three studies that targeted the "individual-organizational" interface were identified. These three studies comprised one RCT, one noncontrolled study, and one qualitative study, each of which was considered to be of low methodological quality.

There was limited evidence for the efficacy of such approaches. Effect of web-based assertion training for stress management of Japanese nurses.

Obama Discusses Managing Stress

Journal of Nursing Management ; 15 6 : Journal of occupational health ; 50 2 : Feasibility and potentials of online support for stress management among secondary school teachers. Stress and Health ; 27 3 : ee Three organization-focused interventions were identified, which comprised the delivery of e-learning programs for managers. Effects of web-based supervisor training on supervisor support and psychological distress among workers: a randomized controlled trial.

Preventive Medicine ; 41 2 : Effects of web-based supervisor training on job stressors and psychological distress among workers: a workplace-based randomized controlled trial. Journal of occupational health ; 48 1 : Pilot study of a cluster randomised trial of a guided e-learning health promotion intervention for managers based on management standards for the improvement of employee well-being and reduction of sickness absence: GEM Study. BMJ open ; 5 10 : ee. Only thirteen studies reviewed here were considered to be of moderate methodological quality, with much of included research of low or very low quality and at serious risk of bias due to limitations in design and implementation.

For example, just four studies blinded participants to their study condition, while only nine described procedures for concealing participant allocation to the researchers themselves. All of the reviewed studies relied on self-report measures, with just three utilizing objective measures such as biological markers to some extent as well.

A lack of long-term follow-up was also problematic. While three studies administered follow-up measures to participant at least 1 year postintervention, only 11 conducted 6-month postintervention follow-up. High rates of participant attrition were an undermining factor in many studies.

Navigation menu

Moreover, low levels of user adherence i. The law of attrition. Journal of medical Internet research ; 7 1 : e The fact that the body of evidence under review here was of generally low quality is perhaps unsurprising as web-based platforms are a relatively new modality for the delivery of worker-directed interventions. As such, many of the included studies were preliminary, of a small scale and uncontrolled, which may be expected as the feasibility and acceptability of web-based interventions are ascertained. More RCTs of higher methodological quality need to be conducted before firmer conclusions may be drawn with regard to the efficacy of web-based interventions for the management of work-related stress.

Only two studies compared web-based interventions directly to face-to-face stress management interventions with same content.

Primary Certificate in Stress Management

Wolever et al. Most interventions were atheoretical 32 of 48, Just 16 referenced a specific theory or model with regard to the formulation or delivery of intervention content. Stress, appraisal, and coping. New York: Springer publishing; Cognitive behaviour modification. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy ; 6 4 : In any case, it is evident that web-based interventions for worker stress that draw upon a stress-specific theoretical model remain the exception rather than the norm. Stress models: A review and suggested new direction.

Occupational health psychology ; 3: There is some low-to-moderate quality evidence that "individual" -focused web-based interventions utilizing cognitive-behavioral, relaxation, mindfulness techniques, or CBT are effective for supporting employee well-being and enabling them to manage their work-related stress.

However, future high-quality studies utilizing these approaches are needed to draw firmer conclusions about their efficacy. Conflicts of interest: The authors declare that there are no conflicts of interest. Already have an account? Login in here. Journal of Occupational Health. Journal home Journal issue Featured articles About the journal.

Web-based interventions for the management of stress in the workplace: Focus, form, and efficacy. Browse "Advance Publication" version. The Current Review. References Appendix 1. Aikens et al. Improvements were maintained at a 6 month follow-up. Allexandre et al. No theory or model indicated in study protocol Significant improvement on measures of stress, burnout and mindfulness no change in productivity or professional efficacy for all intervention groups. Perceived stress the only outcome to improve for the control group. Bolier et al. Feedback provided following screening, access to contact forum provided.

No theory or model indicated in study protocol Significant improvements in mental health and psychological well-being versus controls post-intervention. No impact on worker's general well-being, depression or anxiety scores Billings et al. Marginal changes work productivity and no change in mood, anxiety and depression compared to a control group. Cook et al. No significant improvements on measures of absenteeism or burnout at any point.

Ebert et al. Moderate to large improvements versus controls were also found for mental health, sleep, perseverance cognitions and recovery experiences outcomes. Improvements remained stable at six-month follow-up. ON Stress' programme, problem-solving and emotional-regulation strategies Randomised Control Trial, Wait-List Control 7-week programme; delivered via website and mobile device. Programme was self-guided; participants could chose to receive automatic motivational text messages and small exercises on mobile phones.

No improvements were made on measures of absenteeism, work engagement or physical health-related quality of life. Significant improvements were also made the intervention group on measures related to mental-health; work-related health and skills and competences related to emotional regulation at both assessment points compared to controls.

Work engagement, quality of life physical health , absenteeism and presenteeism did not differ between the intervention and control groups. Eisen et al. Neither intervention group rated themselves as experiencing less stress or more control over stress in their lives following completion of the program or at a one month follow-up.

Feicht et al. No impact on two objective measures of saliva concentrations of cortisol and alpha-amylase, or the Attention Network Test performance Geraedts et al. No difference compared to controls on depressive symptoms anxiety, burnout and work-performance post-intervention or at a one-year follow-up Hasson et al.

No impact on absenteeism or presentism. Hughes et al. RealAge participants received email reminders and health tips, COACH participants received e-mail and phone contact plus in-person assessments at beginning. Transtheoretical model SOC for specific health behaviors used as a moderator in the outcome analyses. Participants classified to stage of change at baseline on the basis of this model. Neither intervention programme had a significant impact on any stress measures.

Imamura et al. Also Imamura et al. Internet CBT- Useful mental health solution series for business Randomised Control Trial; Control group received weekly e-mails with useful stress information. Delivered via website with once a week e-mail reminders from researchers. Small significant improvements compared to controls were also made on scores of dysfunctional attitude, knowledge and self-efficacy.

There were no significant effects on psychological distress or problem-solving. However significantly lower incidence of such episodes reported for those in the intervention group versus the control group. Ketelaar et al. No theory or model indicated in study protocol No significant improvement on scores of work functioning; distress; work-related fatigue; posttraumatic stress or work ability post-intervention or a 3 or 6 month follow-up versus controls Kim et al.

Once a week email reminders sent by researchers. No significant change following adjustment for baseline scores on two secondary outcomes of cognitive flexibility; namely ability to recognise dysfunctional thinking and ability to view situation from multiple perspectives. Kojima et al. No significant change in self-esteem scores. No impact on transformative leadership Mori et al. No impact on psychological distress, problem-solving scores or in the recognition of dysfunctional thinking.

Philips et al. Ruwaard et al. The odds of recovery from clinical stress were significantly higher for participants in the intervention group versus those in the control. Similar recovery effects for depression and emotional exhaustion but not anxiety. Significant maintenance of improvement was also found for measures of depression, emotional exhaustion, stress and anxiety.

Schell et al. One group received tool plus access to stress management exercises and 'chat', one group received health promotion tool only, while third group was inactive control. Shimazu et al. Thiart et al. Significant improvements also on measures of rumination, worrying, sleep-efficiency, restorative sleep, recreational activities and recovery versus controls.

There was no impact on recovery mastery or absenteeism Umanodan et al. Significant increase on scores of knowledge only. No effect on measures of work performance; job satisfaction; social support; problem-solving; avoidance or suppression. Further analysis excluding a 'dashed group' of participants i. Villani et al. Volker et al. Randomised Control Trial, control received standard sickness absence guidance as usual. Blended programme, web-based modules combined with occupation physician consultations; physician received emailed decision aid.

No theory or model indicated in study protocol, Self-efficacy theory referenced in delivery of programme Intervention group returned to the work significantly more quickly than controls. A significantly larger proportion also achieved remission nine months post-baseline compared to controls, although lasting return to work and treatment response did not differ between these two groups. Heart rate coherence the only post-intervention difference between the two mindfulness groups. None of the interventions had any impact on mood, worker productivity, pain or blood pressure. Appendix 2. No impact on psychological flexibility.

Kawai et al. No theory or model indicated in study protocol Significant increases in well-being scores of environmental mastery; positive relationships with others and self-acceptance, plus anxiety. No improvements in depression; job satisfaction; psycho-somatic symptoms, or three other sub-domains of well-being; namely autonomy; personal growth and purpose. No theory or model indicated in study protocol Psychological well-being significantly improved following the intervention.

Beating stress

No changes in depression scores. Feedback provided following screening, plus personalised advice and offer to use an intervention programme. No theory or model indicated in study protocol Significant improvements reported post-module completion on scores of stress; mindfulness; empathy and perspective taking.

One module, 'Introduction to Stress, Resilience and the Relaxation response' was assessed for its impact on scores of stress, resilience and relaxation. Significant improvements were found on participants' scores of stress after undertaking this module, although there were no changes on the two other outcome measures.

No theory or model indicated in study protocol Significant improvements in participants' reported levels of perceived stress, anxiety, empathy and self-efficacy. Williams et al. Transactional Model of Stress Significant reduction in stress intensity post-intervention. Appendix 3. Reported to be easy to follow; stimulated ideas for coping with work-related stress could enhance confidence in managing stress.

Yamagishi et al. No impact on reported work-stress.

No impact on measures of job stress or mental health Mental workload, job control, vigour, and anxiety all significantly worsened in the control group; intervention may have served as a protective factor with regard to employee well-being. Appendix 4. Stansfeld et al. Transactional Model of Stress Small significant positive effect on employee well-being compared to controls. No change in psychological distress, supervisor relationships or support, or sickness absence. Supplementary materials.

What is the Job Demand Control Model?

Share this page. Register Already have an account? Abbott et al. No theory or model indicated in study protocol. No significant difference versus control group post-intervention on scores of distress, quality of life, happiness or work performance. Significant improvement on measures of stress, burnout and mindfulness no change in productivity or professional efficacy for all intervention groups. Range of CBT-based interventions targeting mental fitness; work stress; depressive and panic symptoms and risky drinking behaviour offered following screening. Significant improvements in mental health and psychological well-being versus controls post-intervention.

No impact on worker's general well-being, depression or anxiety scores. Billings et al. Significant 'modest' improvements in knowledge and attitude to seeking help, and in the reduction of stress versus controls.

Randomised Control Trial, Control group received print materials. Intervention had no impact on participant's perceived stress, stage of change in attempting to reduce stress, symptoms of distress or coping skills versus controls. No impact on two stress measures; namely coping with stress and symptoms of distress. The intervention group reported significantly greater decreases in depressive symptoms post-intervention and at 3 and 6 month follow-up points versus controls.

ON Recovery' programme, cognitive-behavioural methods. Fully automated programme only technical support provided. Lazarus' Transactional Model of Stress. ON Stress' programme, problem-solving and emotional-regulation strategies. Secondary Prevention: Abbreviated progressive relaxation and Time Management. Post-session analysis indicated significantly decreased subjectively reported stress post-session, with a significantly greater reduction observed for the 'in-person' group. Secondary Prevention: Principles of Positive Psychology. No impact on two objective measures of saliva concentrations of cortisol and alpha-amylase, or the Attention Network Test performance.

Geraedts et al. Randomised Control Trial, 'Care as Usual' Control received self-help booklet and advised to contact their physician. No difference compared to controls on depressive symptoms anxiety, burnout and work-performance post-intervention or at a one-year follow-up. Hasson et al. Online Health Promotion Tool plus cognitive exercises, time management and relaxation techniques and 'chat'. Randomised Control Trial, Active Control who received health promotion tool only.

Significant improvement by intervention group on perceived ability to manage stress, sleep quality, mental energy, concentration and social support. Heber et al. Transactional Model of Stress. Internet CBT- Useful mental health solution series for business. Randomised Control Trial; Control group received weekly e-mails with useful stress information. No significant improvement on scores of work functioning; distress; work-related fatigue; posttraumatic stress or work ability post-intervention or a 3 or 6 month follow-up versus controls.

Kim et al. Controlled Pre-Post Design non- randomised , Education group control. Transtheorectical Stages of Change Model. Significant reduction in job stress and health-related stress was found post-intervention compared to an education control group. Kimura et al. Web-based Cognitive Behaviour Therapy. Three hour group training in the workplace followed by three personalised e-mail sessions homework and feedback occupational health nurse and physician. Significant decrease in depression scores and improvement in understanding of stress control skills versus controls post-intervention.

Psychological Capital Intervention. Randomised Control Trial, Control received decision-making exercises. Ly et al. Cognitive-Behavioural exercises based on ACT. No impact on transformative leadership. Mori et al.

Managing stress : from theory to application Managing stress : from theory to application
Managing stress : from theory to application Managing stress : from theory to application
Managing stress : from theory to application Managing stress : from theory to application
Managing stress : from theory to application Managing stress : from theory to application
Managing stress : from theory to application Managing stress : from theory to application

Related Managing stress : from theory to application



Copyright 2019 - All Right Reserved