Language, Cognition and Space: The State of the Art and New Directions


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Recent Publications:

His teaching responsibilities include courses on the neural bases of speech and language, the field of cognitive neuroscience, and topics in linguistics.

Research Interests:

His research focuses on how different kinds of linguistic meaning are mediated by different neural systems, drawing on behavioral and lesion data from brain-damaged patients as well as behavioral and functional neuroimaging data from normal subjects. His current projects include the linguistic encoding of action and the syntax-semantics interface.

In addition, he is interested in the evolution of language and the neural correlates of consciousness.

Kemmerer, D. Knowledge of the semantic constraints on adjective order can be selectively impaired. Nouns and verbs in the brain: Implications of linguistic typology for cognitive neuroscience. Witt, J. A functional role for motor simulation in identifying tools. Psychological Science, 21, The Two-Level Theory of verb meaning: An approach to integrating the semantics of action with the mirror neuron system.

Special issue on mirror neurons and the neurobiology of language. How words capture visual experience: The perspective from cognitive neuroscience.

Citations en double

Wolff Eds. His most recent articles explore a geometric approach to the deictic concepts of space, time and modality. Show Hide Table of Contents.

How language shapes the way we think - Lera Boroditsky

Lancaster University. Bangor University. View Website. In this introductory chapter the author addresses the perceptual systems and processes that facilitate this: the sense-perceptory and brain mechanisms that process perceptual information giving rise to spatial experience. That is, this chapter examines primitive concepts which form the bedrock of our ability to think, reason and talk about space and, indeed, more abstract realms. Johns Hopkins University. The main purpose of this chapter is to lay out evidence suggesting a new solution to this impasse. Rather, the authors will present a different twist to the issue, suggested by some newer developments in thinking about the interaction between language and spatial cognition.

Specifically, the authors review evidence that language — once acquired — can strongly modulate our non-linguistic spatial representations, but that much of this is done in the moment of carrying out a specific task, and does not result in permanent organizational change to spatial representation.

David Kemmerer

Benjamin K. University of California, San Diego. He has published widely in cognitive, computational, neuro-, and psycholinguistics. Topics that his research touches include embodiment in syntax and semantics, linguistic relativism, natural language understanding, and connectionist language modeling. This chapter surveys evidence showing that spatial language does indeed engage the neurocognitive systems. Michelle I. University of Louisiana at Lafayette. In this chapter, the author sketches the view through two windows onto the landscape of spatial cognition: one being that of a semantic typologist; the other, that of a psycholinguist.

The evidence gathered by looking through these two windows will suggest that despite surface differences in how we talk about space, all humans are attuned to the same three abstract families of factors — geometric, functional, and qualitative physical — which together influence the ways in which we talk about relations in space. This chapter examines each of these families of factors in turn, along with limitations on proposed meanings based on a single type of factor. University of Notre Dame. For the current chapter, two representations and their constituent processes are of interest: reference frames and spatial templates.

For projective terms, a reference frame consists of a set of three axes that assign directions onto space.


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Specifically, the reference frame is imposed on the reference object, and its axes extend outward defining the space beyond. Purdue University.

Paul Chilton | Linguistics and English Language | Lancaster University

This chapter focuses on the subdomain of location and attempts to integrate new findings from linguistics and neuroscience. Louisiana State University. This chapter is divided in four sections: section 1 establishes a contrast between what the author calls external lexical formation, in which a word is associated to an extra-linguistic concept, and internal lexical formation, that proceeds by division or union of established lexical categories.

In section 2, the author discusses a hierarchy in the formation of spatial terms in languages of the world. Three modes of lexicon development are investigated in section 3. In section 4, the author attempts to explain how the different levels of abstraction of spatial words can influence the acquisition of spatial words. Utrecht University. This chapter discusses that it is becoming clear that geometric notions alone do not suffice to capture the meaning of even very basic prepositions like in and on, let alone an obviously force dynamic preposition like against.

Aïe Aïe Aïe !

However, what is not yet clear is how the role of force-dynamics can be transparently and adequately modeled in representations of the meaning of prepositions. This paper makes some specific proposals about how to do this. This chapter is concerned with modelling the lexical representation of spatial relations, particularly as encoded by English prepositions, and examining how these spatial relations give rise to non-spatial meanings.

Universidad de Zaragoza. In this chapter, the author offers a description of the linguistic means available in Basque for the lexicalisation of space as well as their usage, that is, which of these devices is used more oft en by Basque speakers when they talk about space. More concretely, this chapter deals with those devices used for the description of topological relations, what Levinson et al. Georgetown University.

The purpose of the present work is to begin to test the universality of the Principled Polysemy model by applying the model to the Russian spatial particle, za. In addition, the analysis of za entails considering how the Principled Polysemy model applies to a language whose system of spatial referencing includes a complex system of case marking, which is lacking in English. Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology. Tokyo Polytechnic University. In the remainder of this paper, the authors first review relevant previous studies and present our goal in Section 2.

Language, Cognition and Space: The State of the Art and New Directions Language, Cognition and Space: The State of the Art and New Directions
Language, Cognition and Space: The State of the Art and New Directions Language, Cognition and Space: The State of the Art and New Directions
Language, Cognition and Space: The State of the Art and New Directions Language, Cognition and Space: The State of the Art and New Directions
Language, Cognition and Space: The State of the Art and New Directions Language, Cognition and Space: The State of the Art and New Directions
Language, Cognition and Space: The State of the Art and New Directions Language, Cognition and Space: The State of the Art and New Directions
Language, Cognition and Space: The State of the Art and New Directions Language, Cognition and Space: The State of the Art and New Directions
Language, Cognition and Space: The State of the Art and New Directions Language, Cognition and Space: The State of the Art and New Directions

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