Deadly Election (Flavia Albia Mystery, Book 3)


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Deadly Election by Lindsey Davis
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Jul 19, Irene rated it it was amazing. Lindsey Davis is back in full fettle. We even learn more about Falco. Jan 24, Nathan Albright rated it it was amazing Shelves: challenge What is it that makes a series compelling? While I am fond of historical mysteries, they are not a genre that I have read as widely as I would perhaps enjoy, given that I have a strong bias towards nonfiction as opposed to fiction in my reading. It is pretty clear what led me to trade an hour and a half or so of normal sleep for finishing this novel, though, and that is a compelling story with appealing characters, complex plotting and characterization, and clear relevance as well as an attent What is it that makes a series compelling?

It is pretty clear what led me to trade an hour and a half or so of normal sleep for finishing this novel, though, and that is a compelling story with appealing characters, complex plotting and characterization, and clear relevance as well as an attention to the setting and context of first century Rome. Given that this book was written as part of an extremely long saga and is the third volume of a spinoff of a larger series involving the protagonist's adopted father, the sheer bulk of historical reading that the author must have done to construct this novel shines through in details that turn what could have been a dull political read into a compelling murder mystery involving generational patterns of revenge and families divided against themselves and others.

The result is a fascinating novel that moves along in a compelling fashion over the course of some pages. The story itself follows naturally from the previous volume of the series, where Flavia, having mostly recovered from a near fatal bout with dysentery in the previous book, escapes the cloying care of her vacationing family in Ostia to conduct some business as an auctioneer in Rome during the heat of the summer.

A routine auction turns up a mysterious murder victim whose body has already started to decay and who cannot be clearly identified, and while Flavia attempts to solve the mystery she has to deal with her fussy clients, the Callisti, who are not as wealthy as they might try to promote themselves as, as well the political campaign of S.

Vibius Marinus, who is part of a slightly inbred group of candidates for Plebian Aedile, a position which happens to be held by Vibius' friend and Flavia's lover spoiler alert Manlius Faustus which is perhaps too worthy of a pun for the manly Faustus. While Flavia seeks to untangle the connections between the various too closely connected competitors for the election of the Aedile and solving another murder mystery when the Callisti's agent is found dead and put in the same trunk when it is put on auction again, the reader's attention is drawn to the ways in which political life has always seemed a bit too incestuous.

What does one get out of reading a novel like this one, aside from the rush of reading a well-crafted story about a compelling set of people? Well, the author has given this story more than a usual dose of family drama to add to the claustrophobia of political tension that makes this so worthwhile. Flavia tries to live her own life, yet continually draws upon the resources of her large and powerful extended family. She wonders where she stands with Faustus, and the story decisively moves that romance forward in a compelling way that forces Manlius to act in a brave and honorable fashion to ensure his own freedom of action with regards to his own bossy uncle.

Manlius' associate Vibius, whose campaign he is running, is no less complicated of a person, married to a shrewish and abusive woman who is related to the mess of complicated families, and who commits an act of rather shocking finality that is disclosed at the startling conclusion to the story. Flavia's immensely appealing nature as not only a solver of mystery but also someone who seeks to help other widows adds some depth to her character as well. Davis has a solid history for writing mystery novels. Her main crime solder is Falco; but lately Davis has passed Falco's skills onto his daughter Flavia Albia.

This novel can easily stand alone. Although references are made to earlier works in the Flavia and Falco novels, there is no need to understand prior events.

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This murder mystery is excellent and keeps the reader guessing until the end. The book may be better classified as suspense because Flavia runs out of clues and the crime is effecti Davis has a solid history for writing mystery novels. The book may be better classified as suspense because Flavia runs out of clues and the crime is effectively solved by a spy network of a shifty imperial bureaucrat who helps Flavia because of a prior connection to Falco.

It is a bit deus ex machina. Throw into the mix a romance that borders on trashy, and there is the reason for four stars instead of five. Her knowledge of ancient Rome is fascinating and worth reading just to learn more about Rome. Although Falco and Flavia come from a solid middle class environment, Flavia chooses to live a more proletarian life in the slums.

This allows Davis to construct a brave character who easily mixes with the lower classes. There is also more ready recourse to the brute underworld of ancient Rome. At the same time, Flavia displays her street smarts, toughness, and charm. Consequently, Davis may be writing about a more sympathetic heroine than Falco. The time Davis spends building the environment is tiring. Nearly the first pages are spent on just this task. The complex interplay of the characters even leads to a nice chart later on in the book.

I suspect even Davis was having trouble keeping them together. Once she establishes the cast, things move quickly. It is difficult set the book down except for those chapters where the heroine is in the role of a sexually frustrated girl. The ending is disappointing. Without clues, a mysterious benefactor all but tells Flavia who was behind the murder conspiracy. I suspect Davis is also not satisfied with the result because the benefactor himself dies, ensuring that he does not spoil future books.

Justice is also peculiar to ancient Rome. I think Davis ended things too abruptly. Too many loose ends, just resolved themselves in the epilogue without the usual drawn-out fanfare. However, the journey to the epilogue was a fascinating and enjoyable experience. May 02, Agnesxnitt rated it really liked it. I do like Flavia Albia - she is such a relateable character. However this story kicks off with FA returning back from being cared for after her near fatal illness which occurred at the end of her last case.

Flavia Albia: Deadly Election : A Flavia Albia Mystery 3 by Lindsey Davis (2015, Hardcover)

Faustus has tracked her I do like Flavia Albia - she is such a relateable character. Faustus has tracked her down, near death, and cared for her, only summoning her parents when FA was on the road to recovery. This interesting personal finish to 'Enemies At Home' paints their relationship in a new light, and part of this new investigation is coloured by this sub-theme.

FA is back in Rome, in July. For a convalescing invalid this is bad timing for the city is hot, sticky, humid and people's tempers short and explosive. With her father the now retired - if only to save his skin from Domitian's mercurial wrath - Marcus Didius Falco having inherited an auction house from his grandfather and father, this novel shows us a different side to FA - that of Auctioneer's Daughter. When a powerful family, the Callisti, put up a wooden chest up for sale in a lot reclaimed from their destroyed property at Vesuvius, Flavia sees only a fair to middling profit - not the liquidating corpse that falls out of it.

So this novel covers a recuperating Flavia, a mystery body, the complications of a Roman election, Faustus' intentions becoming more or less clear, an unusual love gift from said Faustus and families with so many secrets to hide it would have confused Machiavelli! Too find one corpse in a charred wooden chest may be considered unfortunate - when a second one occurs in the same wooden chest, Flavia is torn between disbelief and annoyance.

Still, its progress of a kind Loved this book, and am looking forward to reading 4 of the series! The 3rd Flavia Albia investigation. FA is hired by the last chaste man and local aedile the Roman equivalent of local magistrate, moral police, Trading Standards and Police Authority figure Manlius Faustus to investigate on behalf of his friend's campaign to be elected to the Senate. FA, liking a bit of digging the dirt for a price, agrees, despite being still shaky from her recent recovery from dysentery see Novel 2: Enemies At Home for details and return from a recuperative family holiday a The 3rd Flavia Albia investigation.

FA, liking a bit of digging the dirt for a price, agrees, despite being still shaky from her recent recovery from dysentery see Novel 2: Enemies At Home for details and return from a recuperative family holiday at the Didii family seaside villa. As part of her familial duties, FA is also presiding over the family auction house event - not expected to be terribly profitable as its held in July and Rome and it's occupants are sweltering in the heat.

One item offered for sale is an ornately carved chest, from another family with Senatorial aspirations. The chest is being inspected by the auction house staff when they find a not too fresh dead body in it - and the rest of the auction is downhill from there. Convalescing from her illness, FA negotiates the delicate balance of a murder enquiry with increasing murky goings on with the senate campaigns. Faustus' childhood friend, Sextus, also seems to be hiding something - his mother is supporting her son as best she can whilst caring her her husband who is sliding into dementia, and his young children seem happy and normal enough, but where is Julia, his wife?

All careful hints to that end meet with vague mentions of a sister in the country for her first birth and nerves, but FA and Faustus soon find out that not only are the individual candidates all far to intertwined from a social and familial basis, but those binds are far more thorny and dangerous than anyone could have foreseen.

Re-reading in preparation of receiving the latest installment from the library Apr 29, Clemens Schoonderwoert rated it it was amazing. This exciting Roman mystery by Lindsey Davis is the 3rd volume of the delightful Flavia Albia series. The series has for grown from strength to strength and this book can now certainly be compared to the fabulous Falco series, her foster-father, in excitement and suspense. The historical background is pictured in a most wonderful way, so much so that it feels as if you're walking alongside Flavia Albia while dangerous and loving events are taking place in and around Rome.

Apart from her uncles, the This exciting Roman mystery by Lindsey Davis is the 3rd volume of the delightful Flavia Albia series. Apart from her uncles, the Camillus brothers, some other exciting personages who are making their presence felt are, Falco's best friend and old crony Lucius Petronius Longus and Falco's sister and now wife of Petronius, Maia Favonia. The story is set in Rome in the year AD 89, during the reign of the Emperor Domitian, and while inspecting a decomposing corpse Flavia Albia suspects that foul play has been committed and she decides to set off to investigate the identity and death of this man.

But it's also election time and when democracy is for sale anything might and can happen to people, and so while Flavia Albia and the Magistrate, Manlius Faustus, are investigating the candidates, everything at any moment can turn sour between people and eventually it can turn into murder.

In the first century A. So despite the oppressive July heat, she returns to Rome, leaving them at their place on the coast. Albia, daughter of Marcus Didius Falco, the famed private informer now retired , has taken up her father's former profession, and it's time to get back to work. The first order of business, however, is the corpse that was found in a chest sent as part of a large lot to be sold by the Falco In the first century A. The first order of business, however, is the corpse that was found in a chest sent as part of a large lot to be sold by the Falco family auction house.

As the senior family representative in Rome, it falls upon Albia to identify the corpse, find out why he was killed, who killed him, and, most important, how did it end up in the chest. At the same time, her potential young man, Faustus, comes looking for help with his friend Sextus's political campaign. Between the auction business and Roman politics, it's not quite clear which one is the more underhanded and duplicitous. Both, however, are tied together by the mysterious body in the chest, and if Albia isn't able to solve that mystery, it won't be the only body to drop.

Sep 09, Cameron Toney rated it liked it Shelves: mysteries , lady-detectives.

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So, the daughter of our favorite ancient roman private eye is now following along for the family business, solving crimes and getting trouble of her own. Ah, you know, I don't get a total difference in tone from Falco to Flavia Albia. I should be more annoyed by this, but I find myself still enjoying it for its tone and its explorations of ancient Rome. Davis clearly loves Rome, and the mysteries always have lots in them about various aspects of Roman society, which creates a realistic So, the daughter of our favorite ancient roman private eye is now following along for the family business, solving crimes and getting trouble of her own.

Davis clearly loves Rome, and the mysteries always have lots in them about various aspects of Roman society, which creates a realistic world that feels fully developed, and Albia and her friend Manlius Faustus are enjoyable companions, if not entirely unique. The trouble with these books is that the mystery wraps up too quickly, a common trouble in the Falco books.

Suddenly its like the author has remembered that she needs to wrap everything up, and then bam, bad guy captured and all the personal stuff for our heroes is now quickly accelerated. So full points for world building, but I am not at all impressed with the sudden wrap up, and the drama that seemed to be unnecessarily tacked on regarding the romantic relationship blossoming.

Jan 13, Geary rated it it was amazing. The author continues to develop Flavia Albia through an intricately plotted series of scenes while somehow managing the usual overwhelming mass of supporting characters. There are no plot holes at all, again as usual from this wonderful author. The developing relationship with her friend, certain to continue going forward, was perfectly handled. Lindsey Davis, the writer of 20 volumes in the Marcus Didius Falco series also set in Rome, is far and away my favorite author and has been for over 20 years.

I look forward to reading the rest of this series this year catching-up! While it isn't absolutely necessary to read any or all! I would highly recommend reading the first two in the Flavia Albia series before reading this one though. Since Didius Falco's "holiday" from Rome, Flavia Albia his adopted daughter is looking after the family auction business for him. One of the items for sale, a strongbox, contains a lot more than anyone bargained for and leads to Albia and Faustus becoming involved in a family feud.

And it isn't even Albia's family for once … I loved all the Falco novels and it has been great to see that the Flavia Albia stories have continued in the same excellent vein. The historical detail brings ancient Rom Since Didius Falco's "holiday" from Rome, Flavia Albia his adopted daughter is looking after the family auction business for him.

The historical detail brings ancient Rome alive and the characters are just so well written that one cannot help becoming involved in the story. I like the idea that the Albia stories allow us to meet some more, strong Roman women and that was definitely true of this one - although all the Julia's did become slightly confusing! All in all, these are fabulous stories to read and this one is an excellent addition to the series. I'll definitely be reading the rest as they are published. Flavia Albia is helping oversee an auction. Her father, Marcus Didius Falco lead character of many mystery novels himself is at his seaside villa, while Albia is in Rome.

But things turn grim when, in opening a large ornate storage box that is to be auctioned, they find a body. Albia starts looking into it. Meanwhile, her good friend and budding romantic interest Faustus is helping a candidate in an upcoming election, and asks Albia for help in doing the traditional digging up dirt on the oppo Flavia Albia is helping oversee an auction. Meanwhile, her good friend and budding romantic interest Faustus is helping a candidate in an upcoming election, and asks Albia for help in doing the traditional digging up dirt on the opposition.

As it turns out, the two pieces are intertwined, as Albia discovers all the family connections both amongst the candidates and with the family of the murdered man. Also intertwined in the romantic tension between Albia and Faustus. Davis continues her series of fine Roman mysteries. I really liked the Falco series, and have enjoyed, so far, the first three books of the Albia series. Apr 03, Linda rated it it was amazing Shelves: mystery , fiction , historical-novel. It is pretty clear what led me to trade an hour and a half or so of normal sleep for finishing this novel, though, and that is a compelling story with appealing characters, complex plotting and characterization, and clear relevance as well as an attent What is it that makes a series compelling?

It is pretty clear what led me to trade an hour and a half or so of normal sleep for finishing this novel, though, and that is a compelling story with appealing characters, complex plotting and characterization, and clear relevance as well as an attention to the setting and context of first century Rome.

Given that this book was written as part of an extremely long saga and is the third volume of a spinoff of a larger series involving the protagonist's adopted father, the sheer bulk of historical reading that the author must have done to construct this novel shines through in details that turn what could have been a dull political read into a compelling murder mystery involving generational patterns of revenge and families divided against themselves and others. The result is a fascinating novel that moves along in a compelling fashion over the course of some pages.

The story itself follows naturally from the previous volume of the series, where Flavia, having mostly recovered from a near fatal bout with dysentery in the previous book, escapes the cloying care of her vacationing family in Ostia to conduct some business as an auctioneer in Rome during the heat of the summer. A routine auction turns up a mysterious murder victim whose body has already started to decay and who cannot be clearly identified, and while Flavia attempts to solve the mystery she has to deal with her fussy clients, the Callisti, who are not as wealthy as they might try to promote themselves as, as well the political campaign of S.

Vibius Marinus, who is part of a slightly inbred group of candidates for Plebian Aedile, a position which happens to be held by Vibius' friend and Flavia's lover spoiler alert Manlius Faustus which is perhaps too worthy of a pun for the manly Faustus. While Flavia seeks to untangle the connections between the various too closely connected competitors for the election of the Aedile and solving another murder mystery when the Callisti's agent is found dead and put in the same trunk when it is put on auction again, the reader's attention is drawn to the ways in which political life has always seemed a bit too incestuous.

What does one get out of reading a novel like this one, aside from the rush of reading a well-crafted story about a compelling set of people? Well, the author has given this story more than a usual dose of family drama to add to the claustrophobia of political tension that makes this so worthwhile. Flavia tries to live her own life, yet continually draws upon the resources of her large and powerful extended family.

She wonders where she stands with Faustus, and the story decisively moves that romance forward in a compelling way that forces Manlius to act in a brave and honorable fashion to ensure his own freedom of action with regards to his own bossy uncle. Manlius' associate Vibius, whose campaign he is running, is no less complicated of a person, married to a shrewish and abusive woman who is related to the mess of complicated families, and who commits an act of rather shocking finality that is disclosed at the startling conclusion to the story.

Flavia's immensely appealing nature as not only a solver of mystery but also someone who seeks to help other widows adds some depth to her character as well. Davis has a solid history for writing mystery novels. Her main crime solder is Falco; but lately Davis has passed Falco's skills onto his daughter Flavia Albia.

This novel can easily stand alone. Although references are made to earlier works in the Flavia and Falco novels, there is no need to understand prior events.


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This murder mystery is excellent and keeps the reader guessing until the end. The book may be better classified as suspense because Flavia runs out of clues and the crime is effecti Davis has a solid history for writing mystery novels. The book may be better classified as suspense because Flavia runs out of clues and the crime is effectively solved by a spy network of a shifty imperial bureaucrat who helps Flavia because of a prior connection to Falco.

It is a bit deus ex machina. Throw into the mix a romance that borders on trashy, and there is the reason for four stars instead of five. Her knowledge of ancient Rome is fascinating and worth reading just to learn more about Rome. Although Falco and Flavia come from a solid middle class environment, Flavia chooses to live a more proletarian life in the slums. This allows Davis to construct a brave character who easily mixes with the lower classes. There is also more ready recourse to the brute underworld of ancient Rome. At the same time, Flavia displays her street smarts, toughness, and charm.

Consequently, Davis may be writing about a more sympathetic heroine than Falco. The time Davis spends building the environment is tiring. Nearly the first pages are spent on just this task. The complex interplay of the characters even leads to a nice chart later on in the book. I suspect even Davis was having trouble keeping them together. Once she establishes the cast, things move quickly. It is difficult set the book down except for those chapters where the heroine is in the role of a sexually frustrated girl.

The ending is disappointing. Without clues, a mysterious benefactor all but tells Flavia who was behind the murder conspiracy. I suspect Davis is also not satisfied with the result because the benefactor himself dies, ensuring that he does not spoil future books. Justice is also peculiar to ancient Rome. I think Davis ended things too abruptly.

Too many loose ends, just resolved themselves in the epilogue without the usual drawn-out fanfare. However, the journey to the epilogue was a fascinating and enjoyable experience. May 02, Agnesxnitt rated it really liked it. I do like Flavia Albia - she is such a relateable character. However this story kicks off with FA returning back from being cared for after her near fatal illness which occurred at the end of her last case. Faustus has tracked her I do like Flavia Albia - she is such a relateable character. Faustus has tracked her down, near death, and cared for her, only summoning her parents when FA was on the road to recovery.

This interesting personal finish to 'Enemies At Home' paints their relationship in a new light, and part of this new investigation is coloured by this sub-theme. FA is back in Rome, in July. For a convalescing invalid this is bad timing for the city is hot, sticky, humid and people's tempers short and explosive.

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With her father the now retired - if only to save his skin from Domitian's mercurial wrath - Marcus Didius Falco having inherited an auction house from his grandfather and father, this novel shows us a different side to FA - that of Auctioneer's Daughter. When a powerful family, the Callisti, put up a wooden chest up for sale in a lot reclaimed from their destroyed property at Vesuvius, Flavia sees only a fair to middling profit - not the liquidating corpse that falls out of it.

So this novel covers a recuperating Flavia, a mystery body, the complications of a Roman election, Faustus' intentions becoming more or less clear, an unusual love gift from said Faustus and families with so many secrets to hide it would have confused Machiavelli! Too find one corpse in a charred wooden chest may be considered unfortunate - when a second one occurs in the same wooden chest, Flavia is torn between disbelief and annoyance.

Still, its progress of a kind Loved this book, and am looking forward to reading 4 of the series! The 3rd Flavia Albia investigation. FA is hired by the last chaste man and local aedile the Roman equivalent of local magistrate, moral police, Trading Standards and Police Authority figure Manlius Faustus to investigate on behalf of his friend's campaign to be elected to the Senate. FA, liking a bit of digging the dirt for a price, agrees, despite being still shaky from her recent recovery from dysentery see Novel 2: Enemies At Home for details and return from a recuperative family holiday a The 3rd Flavia Albia investigation.

FA, liking a bit of digging the dirt for a price, agrees, despite being still shaky from her recent recovery from dysentery see Novel 2: Enemies At Home for details and return from a recuperative family holiday at the Didii family seaside villa. As part of her familial duties, FA is also presiding over the family auction house event - not expected to be terribly profitable as its held in July and Rome and it's occupants are sweltering in the heat.

One item offered for sale is an ornately carved chest, from another family with Senatorial aspirations. The chest is being inspected by the auction house staff when they find a not too fresh dead body in it - and the rest of the auction is downhill from there. Convalescing from her illness, FA negotiates the delicate balance of a murder enquiry with increasing murky goings on with the senate campaigns. Faustus' childhood friend, Sextus, also seems to be hiding something - his mother is supporting her son as best she can whilst caring her her husband who is sliding into dementia, and his young children seem happy and normal enough, but where is Julia, his wife?

All careful hints to that end meet with vague mentions of a sister in the country for her first birth and nerves, but FA and Faustus soon find out that not only are the individual candidates all far to intertwined from a social and familial basis, but those binds are far more thorny and dangerous than anyone could have foreseen. Re-reading in preparation of receiving the latest installment from the library Apr 29, Clemens Schoonderwoert rated it it was amazing. This exciting Roman mystery by Lindsey Davis is the 3rd volume of the delightful Flavia Albia series.

The series has for grown from strength to strength and this book can now certainly be compared to the fabulous Falco series, her foster-father, in excitement and suspense. The historical background is pictured in a most wonderful way, so much so that it feels as if you're walking alongside Flavia Albia while dangerous and loving events are taking place in and around Rome.

Apart from her uncles, the This exciting Roman mystery by Lindsey Davis is the 3rd volume of the delightful Flavia Albia series. Apart from her uncles, the Camillus brothers, some other exciting personages who are making their presence felt are, Falco's best friend and old crony Lucius Petronius Longus and Falco's sister and now wife of Petronius, Maia Favonia. The story is set in Rome in the year AD 89, during the reign of the Emperor Domitian, and while inspecting a decomposing corpse Flavia Albia suspects that foul play has been committed and she decides to set off to investigate the identity and death of this man.

But it's also election time and when democracy is for sale anything might and can happen to people, and so while Flavia Albia and the Magistrate, Manlius Faustus, are investigating the candidates, everything at any moment can turn sour between people and eventually it can turn into murder. In the first century A.

So despite the oppressive July heat, she returns to Rome, leaving them at their place on the coast. Albia, daughter of Marcus Didius Falco, the famed private informer now retired , has taken up her father's former profession, and it's time to get back to work. The first order of business, however, is the corpse that was found in a chest sent as part of a large lot to be sold by the Falco In the first century A. The first order of business, however, is the corpse that was found in a chest sent as part of a large lot to be sold by the Falco family auction house.

As the senior family representative in Rome, it falls upon Albia to identify the corpse, find out why he was killed, who killed him, and, most important, how did it end up in the chest. At the same time, her potential young man, Faustus, comes looking for help with his friend Sextus's political campaign.

Between the auction business and Roman politics, it's not quite clear which one is the more underhanded and duplicitous. Both, however, are tied together by the mysterious body in the chest, and if Albia isn't able to solve that mystery, it won't be the only body to drop. Sep 09, Cameron Toney rated it liked it Shelves: mysteries , lady-detectives. So, the daughter of our favorite ancient roman private eye is now following along for the family business, solving crimes and getting trouble of her own.

Ah, you know, I don't get a total difference in tone from Falco to Flavia Albia. I should be more annoyed by this, but I find myself still enjoying it for its tone and its explorations of ancient Rome. Davis clearly loves Rome, and the mysteries always have lots in them about various aspects of Roman society, which creates a realistic So, the daughter of our favorite ancient roman private eye is now following along for the family business, solving crimes and getting trouble of her own.

Davis clearly loves Rome, and the mysteries always have lots in them about various aspects of Roman society, which creates a realistic world that feels fully developed, and Albia and her friend Manlius Faustus are enjoyable companions, if not entirely unique. The trouble with these books is that the mystery wraps up too quickly, a common trouble in the Falco books.

Suddenly its like the author has remembered that she needs to wrap everything up, and then bam, bad guy captured and all the personal stuff for our heroes is now quickly accelerated. So full points for world building, but I am not at all impressed with the sudden wrap up, and the drama that seemed to be unnecessarily tacked on regarding the romantic relationship blossoming. Jan 13, Geary rated it it was amazing. The author continues to develop Flavia Albia through an intricately plotted series of scenes while somehow managing the usual overwhelming mass of supporting characters.

There are no plot holes at all, again as usual from this wonderful author. The developing relationship with her friend, certain to continue going forward, was perfectly handled. Lindsey Davis, the writer of 20 volumes in the Marcus Didius Falco series also set in Rome, is far and away my favorite author and has been for over 20 years. I look forward to reading the rest of this series this year catching-up! While it isn't absolutely necessary to read any or all! I would highly recommend reading the first two in the Flavia Albia series before reading this one though.

Since Didius Falco's "holiday" from Rome, Flavia Albia his adopted daughter is looking after the family auction business for him. One of the items for sale, a strongbox, contains a lot more than anyone bargained for and leads to Albia and Faustus becoming involved in a family feud. And it isn't even Albia's family for once … I loved all the Falco novels and it has been great to see that the Flavia Albia stories have continued in the same excellent vein. The historical detail brings ancient Rom Since Didius Falco's "holiday" from Rome, Flavia Albia his adopted daughter is looking after the family auction business for him.

The historical detail brings ancient Rome alive and the characters are just so well written that one cannot help becoming involved in the story. I like the idea that the Albia stories allow us to meet some more, strong Roman women and that was definitely true of this one - although all the Julia's did become slightly confusing! All in all, these are fabulous stories to read and this one is an excellent addition to the series. I'll definitely be reading the rest as they are published.

Flavia Albia is helping oversee an auction. Her father, Marcus Didius Falco lead character of many mystery novels himself is at his seaside villa, while Albia is in Rome. But things turn grim when, in opening a large ornate storage box that is to be auctioned, they find a body. Albia starts looking into it.

Meanwhile, her good friend and budding romantic interest Faustus is helping a candidate in an upcoming election, and asks Albia for help in doing the traditional digging up dirt on the oppo Flavia Albia is helping oversee an auction. Meanwhile, her good friend and budding romantic interest Faustus is helping a candidate in an upcoming election, and asks Albia for help in doing the traditional digging up dirt on the opposition.

As it turns out, the two pieces are intertwined, as Albia discovers all the family connections both amongst the candidates and with the family of the murdered man. Also intertwined in the romantic tension between Albia and Faustus. Davis continues her series of fine Roman mysteries. I really liked the Falco series, and have enjoyed, so far, the first three books of the Albia series. Apr 03, Linda rated it it was amazing Shelves: mystery , fiction , historical-novel. As we finished the previous book, readers find Flavia Albia snatched from death by the care of Tiberius Mantius Faustus -- one of the most romantic scenes ever!

After a few weeks of care by her family at their seaside villa, Albia has returned to Rome. She has recovered from her illness for the most part although she is not as robust as she was. She also has been missing Tiberius and wondering if they have a future together but the upcoming auction at Falco's auction house is her supposed reaso As we finished the previous book, readers find Flavia Albia snatched from death by the care of Tiberius Mantius Faustus -- one of the most romantic scenes ever!

She also has been missing Tiberius and wondering if they have a future together but the upcoming auction at Falco's auction house is her supposed reason for returning. Just to make it interesting, a dead body is found in a chest that is going to be offered at the auction and of course Albia is drawn into solving this mystery. Both, however, are tied together by the mysterious body in the chest, and if Albia isn't able to solve that mystery, it won't be the only body to drop.

Additional Product Features Dewey Edition. Davis combines excellent research, expansive knowledge, and vivid writing to immerse readers in ancient Rome. The people and the places of the city seem both authentic and familiar Davis delights once again with her trademark blend of quirky characters and rich period detail Readers can anticipate Flavia Albia to be a compelling presence for years to come. Provides hope that Flavia could have as long a literary run as Marcus.

Deadly Election (Flavia Albia Mystery, book 3) by Lindsey Davis

Show More Show Less. Add to Cart. Any Condition Any Condition. See all No ratings or reviews yet. Be the first to write a review. Her by Pierre Jeanty , Paperback 6.

Deadly Election (Flavia Albia Mystery, Book 3) Deadly Election (Flavia Albia Mystery, Book 3)
Deadly Election (Flavia Albia Mystery, Book 3) Deadly Election (Flavia Albia Mystery, Book 3)
Deadly Election (Flavia Albia Mystery, Book 3) Deadly Election (Flavia Albia Mystery, Book 3)
Deadly Election (Flavia Albia Mystery, Book 3) Deadly Election (Flavia Albia Mystery, Book 3)
Deadly Election (Flavia Albia Mystery, Book 3) Deadly Election (Flavia Albia Mystery, Book 3)
Deadly Election (Flavia Albia Mystery, Book 3) Deadly Election (Flavia Albia Mystery, Book 3)
Deadly Election (Flavia Albia Mystery, Book 3) Deadly Election (Flavia Albia Mystery, Book 3)
Deadly Election (Flavia Albia Mystery, Book 3) Deadly Election (Flavia Albia Mystery, Book 3)

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