College Unbound: The Future of Higher Education and What It Means for Students


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High-Level Thoughts

What bothers me most about this book is a message which goes in two directions. The liberal arts are great, and they are lousy. Find a field that will get you a job, but who can predict what jobs will be hot in ten years? Business, the most popular major nationally, certainly connects with the world of work, but Selingo points out that of all fields of study, business majors learn the least in college.

It's worth reading a book that makes you think, but this would have been a better one with more scholarly proof of educational outcomes for new approaches to learning, and a more clear message for change. View 1 comment. Feb 19, Bob rated it really liked it Shelves: higher-education. That is the question parents and students are increasingly facing. And how does one evaluate the education on offer beyond the attractive brochures and tours of campus? These are questions Jeffrey Selingo addresses. As a writer for The Chronicle of Higher Education he is well-positioned to help parents and students to understand the landscape of higher education.

Selingo begins by describing the vigorous competition among institutions to provide what is perceived as the gateway credential to an upwardly mobile economic life, With that, he describes the efforts of colleges to woo students with everything from luxury dorms to climbing walls. He also explores the growing crisis of student loan debt "the trillion-dollar problem" as well as the shaky balance sheets of some colleges.

Desperate for "full tuition paying" students, universities are increasingly marketing themselves to affluent or government-supported internationals from other countries. This leads to a discussion of forces that are disrupting and changing the higher ed landscape. Much of this focuses on the game-changing advent of online technology and how this is changing the student learning experience and how people put a degree together. The third part of his book focuses on the future.

College (Un)Bound: The Future of Higher Ed

Selingo starts with the issues of how college choices are made and the need to ask harder questions about graduation rates, particularly for students in one's economic bracket. He contends that reputation does matter, not only in return on investment but also, in many cases, in retention and graduation rates. He also argues that it is important to look at curriculum, that developing critical thinking skills matters more than majors and that collaborative work experiences, study abroad, and capstone projects position students not only for their first jobs but subsequent ones.

The book concludes with a collection of vignettes of creative programs and a checklist for parents and students as they engage the college search process. It seems to me that Selingo's book is very helpful reading for students and parents as they enter the college search. It is also important in naming some of the elephants in the room in higher education discussions. He identifies questions and resources that help parents go into the college search with eyes wide open.

What I find less helpful is the acceptance of the value of college primarily or almost exclusively in terms of career preparation. I think this is the big concern of most parents and students but it represents a shift in thinking about the mission of higher education that goes unacknowledged. Selingo certainly describes instances of students finding a "calling" through their university experiences but it is disturbing to find one more instance of an approach to college education that largely portrays both colleges and the students who go through them as cogs in our economic machinery.

It seems to me that this is neither what colleges nor people exist for. American higher education is at a turning point, argues Jeffrey J. What if college students move through classes not according to a semester model but based on American higher education is at a turning point, argues Jeffrey J. What if college students move through classes not according to a semester model but based on how soon they master the curriculum? What if most colleges accept most transfer credits?

These are some of the innovations currently evolving on college campuses that will shape the higher education experience of students currently in elementary, junior high, and high school. I highly recommend College Un bound to educators and parents of students destined for college. May 24, Eustacia Tan rated it really liked it Shelves: netgalley. I'm not sure that I should be reading this book, seeing as I'm trying to adapt to university and need encouragement not a questioning of whether I should even be here, but I read it.

And I can sum up the book by quoting the author this quote comes towards the end of the book : "I believe additional education after high school is absolutely critical. I still consider a two- or four-year college campus one of the best places to obtain that education. The problem is that a significant number of stu I'm not sure that I should be reading this book, seeing as I'm trying to adapt to university and need encouragement not a questioning of whether I should even be here, but I read it.

The problem is that a significant number of students today are poorly matched with the college they eventually attend. We lack high-quality educational substitutes for those who are ill-suited to traditional colleges and universities at eighteen. It seems we wend some kids off to college because there is no where else to put them.

The campus is a convenient, albeit expensive, warehouse. Except for some people who aren't suited. And the present system sucks. But other than that, it's all good! Ok, so I'm making it sound a lot more cynical than it is. The author really does believe in the university of tomorrow. The university of tomorrow is online at least partly and is extremely personalised.

It's also cheaper I can't argue with that! Being in a university and happy in it! By the way, is there a difference because college and university? I know there is one in England, but how about America? This book is America-centric so I'm not sure if "College" is the accepted term. And yes, this is, to me, the book's weakness. It's very America-centric. If you're not interested in American Higher Education, you don't need to bother reading this. Disclaimer: I got a free copy of this book from the publishers via NetGalley in exchange for a free and honest review This review was first posted to Inside the mind of a Bibliophle View 2 comments.

This was a fascinating book for anyone interested in the future of higher education, but especially for parents of students who are beginning the college selection process. Jeffrey Selingo has divided the book into several sections: How We Got Here which examines the reasons for ballooning college tuitions, among other things ; The Disruption discussing MOOC's and the impact of technology on personalized learning ; The Future looking at the students of tomorrow, the value of various degrees, This was a fascinating book for anyone interested in the future of higher education, but especially for parents of students who are beginning the college selection process.

Jeffrey Selingo has divided the book into several sections: How We Got Here which examines the reasons for ballooning college tuitions, among other things ; The Disruption discussing MOOC's and the impact of technology on personalized learning ; The Future looking at the students of tomorrow, the value of various degrees, and necessary skills for the future ; and several concluding chapters, including one that outlines the forward-thinking programs happening at several colleges around the country, and one with a fabulous checklist of questions to ask on college tours.

The only reason I didn't give this book 5 stars is that sometimes it felt a little long. Overall, though, it is a very worthwhile and interesting read. I underlined over things while I was reading thanks, Kindle, for that stat! As a graduate of a prestigious private liberal arts college myself, I know that I gained a great deal from my college education; but as a parent of a college freshman, I wish I'd known some of these things when he was going through the college search.

This book is a great companion book to Blake Boles' The Art of Self-Directed Learning; both books discuss the fact that many college-bound high school seniors go to college mainly because it is expected of them, and not because it is a means to an end. Both authors suggest that a gap year or year of service might be beneficial to many students, to help them identify their interests and gain maturity. The skyrocketing costs of college in this country, the 50 million Americans who hold some kind of student loan, developing technologies, grade inflation, tuition discounting, the large percentage of students who transfer schools or never graduate, employer demand for credentials - all of these issues are addressed in this comprehensive examination of higher education in this country.

Absolutely a worthwhile read. Thanks to the publisher and NetGalley for a copy of this book to review prior to the paperback release. Oct 03, Peter Mcloughlin rated it really liked it Shelves: both , technology , to , economics , intellectual-history , to , american-history , nonfiction , general-history , education. Higher Education was in the past one of the slowest changing institutions in fact the University of Paris and Oxford date back to the middle ages and many of the structures in place date from that era and the U.

This is changing fast now. In the past few decades a college degree became the primary ticket to the middle class and universities could raise tuition knowing parents would pony up because higher ed. Since the financial meltdown of and the onslaught of new technology this decades long dynamic has been thrown into doubt. The University is becoming unbundled as students go online and flip through colleges.

Nontraditional students and online education are throwing the old model into crisis. Grade inflation and plush campus amenities that make colleges seem like vacation resorts are problems that the colleges have been dealing with for over a decade and making the public and employers call into question the value of higher education. With endowments losing money in the new market and parents and students becoming more price sensitive the old business model may face serious problems.

This book spends equal measures of space on the problems and on the opportunities of new technology and market place demands to elucidate the forces that are transforming the college system. I have some more detail in my status updates but I got a lot from this book. We just got to straighten out education and once education is accessible to the worthy capitalism and its structural problems will fix themselves.

Sorry for the bit editorializing but I am sick of 90s new democrats telling me to get the right degree and that will fix the problem. Jul 19, Sarabi Eventide rated it it was ok. As the title promises, College Un bound is an investigation of the problems with U.

College Unbound by Jeffrey Selingo Book Review | itocagawoler.ga

While the information in the book was decent, none of it was new or surprising. The fact of the matter is, not very much has changed in U. This book added nothing to my life, because I knew all of the issues it discussed. I will give Selingo credit for discussing some of the solutions. For some people, the information in the book may be a revelation; people who do not have family members who have been to college may benefit from the book.

I, however, fall somewhere in the middle of the spectrum. May 27, Amanda rated it liked it. As a higher education professional I was intrigued by the subject matter.

ISBN 13: 9780544027077

The author provided rational and thoughtful perspectives that will be helpful for any emerging adult - except that he gives an incomplete picture. While deriding "student services" he fails to acknowledge the reality of the student affairs profession. The cadre of professionals that have, as he characterizes it, contributed to the costs of college have also been the ones on the front lines responding to the demands of both As a higher education professional I was intrigued by the subject matter.

The cadre of professionals that have, as he characterizes it, contributed to the costs of college have also been the ones on the front lines responding to the demands of both students and their parents. The student affairs profession exists because faculty were unwilling or incapable of making connections with students. Yes - there are excesses in pandering to the commercialization and commodification of higher education that often reflects poorly on student affairs folks he cites High Point University - but as a whole we want the same thing we hope the students and parents want, graduation and future professional success.

Students especially need to take responsibility for not being drawn in like kids at the McDonald's Playland Sep 02, Jason rated it really liked it Shelves: read With a kid starting high school, this was a valuable read for me. I would probably give it a 4. I would give it slightly less than 4 stars for layout however. It seems to ramble through some sections and lack focus. That said, I think it was a valuable read for me and I'm glad I put the time into it.

Positives: - Discussion of the cost of education per year and relative strength of school - Very val With a kid starting high school, this was a valuable read for me. Positives: - Discussion of the cost of education per year and relative strength of school - Very valuable list of questions to be asking as looking at schools - Calculation discussion of Return on Investment for school - Explanation of the reasons for run away costs in education - Discussion of whether college even is the right fit at all Negatives: - A bit stale - A bit repetitive - Too general in application to students.

Overall, I appreciate the work of this book and the questions it will guide me to ask as my child gets ready for college. May 31, Elizabeth rated it it was amazing. This book is fantastic, discussing the changes in the collegiate landscape over the past decade and the possible changes to come and the financial implications of those changes.

I think it should be required reading for teachers, parents of teenagers, and teenagers. May 25, SJ Loria rated it really liked it. What we mean by college needs to be understood, from multiple angles. If you took out a big loan to pay for college, you need to read this book. If you were buying a house, would you go to an open house? I hope so, but would you then would you look up the neighborhood around it? Consider which direction the crime rates or property values are tending?

Would you visit at multiple times? And so is college. It is important to be educated and informed about the necessary step in front of you, and equally important to understand the expense you are taking on and analyze it in the best manner possible before signing the lease, or in the case of a teenager, the student loan agreement and college entrance paperwork. We still together?


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If you are surprised that 17 and 18 year olds make emotionally charged decisions without consulting facts then you have been in higher ed too long. Of course they make emotionally charged decisions. But how can we as adults just let them take out huge investments without properly educating them?

Should college councilors be held to a higher standard? Students, you should you should be familiar with all the following terms as they relate to you. Educators, I propose we understand these concepts before sending every kid to college like a knee jerk reaction. Net tuition per student, discount rate versus yield at your school. Earning potential of graduates at your school compared to others. Your future is too important and now too expensive to just give it the old college try anymore.

Ultimately what I enjoyed about this book is that while Salingo analyzes the facts, and certainly presents what could be a very doomsday scenario for the current state and the near future of higher education, he remains optimistic and solution oriented. There American dream may be more statistically difficult than ever before, but we do not chose the time we are born into. We can however, maximize our potential right now, and this is the kind of book that is so important to read because it helps you do that. Salingo, follow up chat. Quotes At the colleges and universities attended by most American students, costs are spiraling out of control and quality is declining just as increasing international competition demands that higher education be more productive and less expensive.

IX American higher education has become, what in the business world, would be called a mature enterprise: increasingly risk-averse, at time self-satisfied, and unduly expensive. XII Some 50 million Americans now hold some kind of student loan, slightly more than the number of people on Medicare and almost as many as receive Social Security benefits. The result is the US higher education system is becoming less of a meritocracy. XI The people we think of as traditional college students, yeah olds, make up a little more than a third of enrollments at colleges…We think of American higher education as cohesive system, but there is nothing uniform about it.

Colleges and universities provide a wide variety of educational and social services and bring them together in one package, which usually is delivered at one physical location. That system is collapsing under an unsustainable financial model. They employ more than 3. More than ever, American colleges and universities seem to be in every business but education.

Saturdays and weeknights. This program at American University is a perfect example of a new product designed to drive demand for a communications degree at a time when jobs in the field are hard to come by. How do you learn entrepreneurship when a big part of it is risk taking, an innate quality?

In , about , were awarded, a number that has doubled since the s. It matters so much to some universities that they have spent tuition dollars to gain an advantage. Around a quarter of the top hundred universities on the list have doubled their own spending on research in the last decade. But get this Nearly half of them ended up falling in the rankings. Despite a tough job market and a glut of lawyers in most states, law schools keep adding spots for students…Take Texas as an example.

Even as the cash-strapped legislate there was talking about closing four community colleges in , they approved a new law school in downtown Dallas for Univeristy of North Texas. A state report noted Texas already produces more lawyers than it has job openings…. Still, university officials, backed by a group of powerful local politicians, prevailed with their argument: Dallas has two law schools, both private, and Houston, a smaller metro region, has three law schools, including a public option.

A similar me-too argument.. Students had to get accepted…maintain a minimum GPA…The change now is that this merit aid goes disproportionately to students from upper-income families, who could afford to pay more of the cost of college and would go to college no matter what. All this in an effort to gain position for greater prestige. As recently as , the United States ranked first. In , the A represented less than one-third of all grades. Through surveys they learned that students spent about twelve hours a week studying on average, much of that time in groups.

Students who studied alone did better [take that collaborative learning must happen always no matter what educational bureaucrats], as did students whose teachers had high expectations or assigned a significant amount of reading or writing. Those who majored in humanities, social sciences, hard sciences, and math did best [on assessments that measure critical thinking]. And the majors that did the worst? Education, social work, and the most popular major on US college campuses: business. And this is hard to controversial and rarely put into place…why? Luxury accommodations not only add to the sense of entitlement [and balloon costs], but offer few opportunities for students to learn how to get along with different people and manage conflicts.

Education debt may be good debt, but even too much of a good thing can hurt you.


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The focus, instead, was on other figures: discount rates and yield the percentage of accepted students who send deposits to enroll …. Business and law schools are no longer the cash cows they once were for their parent institutions…. Unless they suddenly find alternative revenue sources the silver bullet everyone is looking for , these colleges either need to cut costs quickly or face the prospect of a long, painful path to closure. That means it is not mandated by the federal government or the state constitution, like public K education or Medicaid. Higher ed is often at the end of the line when lawmakers dole out money.

In recent years, not much has been left to give to colleges. Students have had to pick up more of the bill for their education. Is it the organization required for this complexity that leads to higher costs, Clay Christensen tells me. Most industries, he says, focus on one business model at a time. It is not just about pure costs anymore, as Kirshner observed.

In the Pew survey, about half of Americans think that the higher education system is doing a poor or fair job in providing value for the money spent…Sure, the climbing walls, the new dorms, the fancy food in the dining hall, and the sports teams will continue to be sales tools employed by many colleges to reel in students. How rigorously colleges prepare students for the workforce, as well as mature them for life, will play a greater role in the calculation of value.

The basic concept is not new, of course. Literature classes have been taught this way for decades. The role of a faculty member is changing to one more akin to a coach than a revered figure at the head of the class. Apr 19, Shannon L. Gonzalez rated it it was amazing.

College Unbound by Jeffrey Selingo

Selingo Every parent of a high-school and middle-school student should read this book. It will open the eyes of the public to what is going on in higher academia behind the closed golden gates. As tuition increases each year, the question is raised how much is too much? When will it stop and at what point does that little piece of paper degree become too expensive and not worth the enormous debt to earn it?

The colleges look like resorts, not institutions of learning. Its business, the more students willing to pay the high prices, the more the colleges earn.

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Author Jeffrey Selingo takes the reader through the history of what colleges used to be, and what they are now today; it is frightening to see what has become of them. It is equally as frightening to realize society still holds the degree as a golden ticket towards success in life. With the new reality it simply is not true. Graduates are now questioning if that amount of debt post graduation is really worth it when they are only in minimum wage jobs.

The author chronicles how online education, MOOCs and online lectures of Ivy League professors are paving a new path for entrance to college. With the ease and access for anyone to learn, the priority of learning for the sake of learning takes on new meaning. He details how alternative credentials of completion are being invented such as badges and accomplishment certificates.

He mentions how the student only going to one school their entire academic career is moving towards an ala carte career to attain the needed requirements from many means. As the children of today grow up towards college they will change the way teaching is done. They are so connected digitally that traditional means of teaching has to be reexamined. So what is the future of higher education in America? No other compensation was awarded. Oct 07, Rhys rated it it was ok. An unabashed paean to technology and corporate education.

While college have spent millions to outf An unabashed paean to technology and corporate education. But the book makes some sense, if you believe education is, at its core, information dissemination. Maybe if the corporations want an educated workforce, they should help pay for it … say, though taxes. And the real groaner: "Both the economy and society are moving away from the logical, linear, computer-like attributes of the left brain to a conceptual age when the big-picture capabilities of the right brain will be increasingly important.

Only a corporate member of a Board of Trustees would like a book like this. Jun 13, Marks54 rated it liked it. This is a short but well done summary of some of the major problems facing higher education written by a staffer on the Chronicle of Higher Education. Selingo does a good job on the shift to consumerist education pursuing credentials - and the related issues of stagnant achievement and poor graduation rates.

His description of financial issues related to rising tuition rates and the huge student loan problem is also good. The most effective chapter for me analyzes the industry in terms of its un This is a short but well done summary of some of the major problems facing higher education written by a staffer on the Chronicle of Higher Education. The most effective chapter for me analyzes the industry in terms of its unsustainable business model stemming from rising institutional debt, declining state support, the maturation of the pool of paying students, the growth of competition, and the rapid approach of price levels that will drive most families away.

The book also has a nice chapter explaining the growth of MOOCs and other online course alternatives and generally does a good job with technology - although it is far from clear how universities will become grossly more efficient. The last portion of the book considers a variety of models for how the way education is provided may change in the future. These are plausible developments but not as relevant to current issues as the earlier chapters were.

There are also good references and hints for finding education statistics. This is a good volume for those wanting to catch up on the current turmoil in higher education and is very accessible to more general readers. There wasn't that much new information I'm this book for anyone that has followed challenges and changes to higher education.

It was preaching to the choir when I read page after page about how higher education prices are becoming too steep to remain sustainable, especially in the face of improving alternatives that will eventually have to wear down the stairs quo as the world continues to change and evolve with technology and global interactions. The book is broken into three sections. The first There wasn't that much new information I'm this book for anyone that has followed challenges and changes to higher education.

The first details the problems with the current system, many of which boil down to finances and return on investment for a traditional degree. The second section goes over the so called "disruptions" to the current system, which mostly involves online education replacing and complementing face-to-face time.

The third section is about the future. Presumably this shows how new methods can be implemented but I only skimmed this section because I felt like I had got the point of the book. One could just as easily read the conclusion and checklist at the back to get most of the content out of this book without reading anecdote after contextualizing story.

This was a similar problem I had when reading a book on raising innovators and many other education books. Aug 16, Kylie Larson rated it it was amazing. One of the best highered reads I've seen in awhile. Some notable quotes: "For every dollar earned by college graduates, those who drop out without a degree earn sixty-seven cents. More than one-third of them say American higher education is headed in the wrong direction. That same year, in the midst of a worldwide economic slump, education star One of the best highered reads I've seen in awhile. That same year, in the midst of a worldwide economic slump, education start-ups received financial backing, the most since , during the height of the dot-com boom.

Jun 17, Jessica Wildfire rated it liked it. Selingo makes some good points throughout the book, but he alienated me in the last chapter with his agenda to push new "trends" in higher education that I find antithetical to the spirit of the university. The whole time, I thought his main argument was to stop throwing away money on gimmicks and start investing in the basics--our faculty, our students, our libraries. In lieu of these points, and perhaps filling the need to "say something new," I think Selingo commits the fallacy of arguing tha Selingo makes some good points throughout the book, but he alienated me in the last chapter with his agenda to push new "trends" in higher education that I find antithetical to the spirit of the university.

In lieu of these points, and perhaps filling the need to "say something new," I think Selingo commits the fallacy of arguing that Silicon Valley will solve all of our problems. As he well knows, adjuncts make up a large portion of the academic work force. Universities profit off their underpaid labor at a disturbing level. Meanwhile, upper administration salaries and positions have skyrocketed, as has spending on dorms, gyms, stadiums, and dining halls. I would've appreciated more discussion of the importance of adjunct pay at the end of the book and I'm saying that as a TT professor, not a disgruntled adjunct with an axe to grind.

Nov 13, David rated it liked it. If you work at a college or follow higher ed closely in the news yes and yes for me , most of this will not be new, but for any reader it's a thoughtful overview. Oct 14, Michellena rated it really liked it. The great credential race has turned universities into big business and fostered an environment where middle-tier colleges can command elite university-level tuition while concealing staggeringly low graduation rates, churning out graduates with few of the skills needed for a rapidly evolving job market.

Selingo not only turns a critical eye on the current state of higher education but also predicts how technology will transform it for the better. Free massive online open courses MOOCs and hybrid classes, adaptive learning software, and the unbundling of traditional degree credits will increase access to high-quality education regardless of budget or location and tailor lesson plans to individual needs.

One thing is certain—the Class of will have a radically different college experience than their parents. Incisive, urgent, and controversial, College Un bound is a must-read for prospective students, parents, and anyone concerned with the future of American higher education.

College Unbound: The Future of Higher Education and What It Means for Students College Unbound: The Future of Higher Education and What It Means for Students
College Unbound: The Future of Higher Education and What It Means for Students College Unbound: The Future of Higher Education and What It Means for Students
College Unbound: The Future of Higher Education and What It Means for Students College Unbound: The Future of Higher Education and What It Means for Students
College Unbound: The Future of Higher Education and What It Means for Students College Unbound: The Future of Higher Education and What It Means for Students
College Unbound: The Future of Higher Education and What It Means for Students College Unbound: The Future of Higher Education and What It Means for Students
College Unbound: The Future of Higher Education and What It Means for Students College Unbound: The Future of Higher Education and What It Means for Students
College Unbound: The Future of Higher Education and What It Means for Students College Unbound: The Future of Higher Education and What It Means for Students
College Unbound: The Future of Higher Education and What It Means for Students College Unbound: The Future of Higher Education and What It Means for Students
College Unbound: The Future of Higher Education and What It Means for Students College Unbound: The Future of Higher Education and What It Means for Students

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